Jerry Brown on Thursday’s action

From KRON 4:

When asked what he thought about Thursday’s protests at U.C. Berkeley, sparked after he proposed to cut higher education by $1.4 billion to help close the state’s budget gap, Brown said “These are painful cuts, I don’t like to do it, I like the university I went there, I don’t like tuition increases, but we can only live with the money we’re given. As a matter of fact, if the taxes go down the cuts will be doubled, that’s where we are it’s not easy, but I didn’t come here to put sugar and syrup on the problem, I’m telling you the way it is.”

“[W]e can only live with the money we’re given,” as if this were some sort of naturally generated figure!  Fuck Jerry Brown now, and fuck Jerry Brown in the late 70s.  Austerity then, austerity now; no new taxes then, no new taxes now.

Is it surprising that Howard Jarvis famously claimed in 1978, “I knew that Governor Brown was the man who could make [Proposition 13] work?”  As soon as the bill passed, Brown became its most adamant defender:

But this is apparently about “the money we’re given” in the passive voice, as if this clown had nothing to do with it whatsoever.  “If taxes go down the cuts will be doubled.”  This from someone who has been opposing tax hikes for over 30 years.  This from someone who just ran for governor on a platform of austerity.  This from someone who convinced public sector unions to toss him their members’ dues to fund his campaign while he was calling for their pensions to be slashed.

Whenever you hear these Sacramento functionaries naturalize the fiscal crisis, you know something is up.  Do you see Jerry Brown condemning Prop 13?  Do you see him talking about taxing oil extraction?  Do you see him even touching California’s preposterously low corporate tax rates?  No?  Well then fuck this hypocrite.  We won’t pay for your crisis!


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6 responses to “Jerry Brown on Thursday’s action

  1. You’re not paying for anything anyway. It’s real Workers who are doing the paying. Berkeley students are just free-loading while they play at Revolution.

  2. Right, because the accumulation of years of debt costs students nothing whatsoever. Because none of the students at UCB work part- or even full-time while taking a full courseload. Because teaching doesn’t count as “real” work. Because tuition hasn’t quadrupled over the past decade and thus they are “free-loading” as if the 1960 California Public Ed Master Plan were still in effect. And above all, because the students who pulled off Thursday’s action didn’t do so in solidarity with laid-off workers — because Operational Excellence has nothing to do with workers anyway. You’re absolutely right; we should only valorize political actors who resemble the 19th century British industrial proletariat.

  3. 45% of Berkeley students have their tuition fully paid by financial aid. 30% of Berkeley students get money from UC their living expenses. If they were real Workers, instead of university drones passing time playing at Revolution till they get their bourgeois jobs, they’d be struggling more than ‘having a part time job’. As to Solidarity: they came down when they got an amnesty for their own precious butts, and a ‘meeting’ about real Workers. Yeah, that’s the right priority. Good on them!

  4. Could use an IP-check on the above “revolutionary” trolling……

    Great history of what’s behind JB’s particular sort of budget realism, gonna refer Dems I meet.

  5. I agree with thosewhouseit.

    This seems like a pointless argument to get into, but as a non-student and a worker, I welcome campus-based solidarity. Only a fool would turn his or her nose up at people joining the struggle, when our common enemy is so strong.

    We can disagree on tactics and strategy all we want – and hopefully to the end of making us stronger and better fighters – but it seems stupid to argue that students aren’t qualified to fight back against austerity because their authenticity as actors in the struggle is tainted by the possibility that they might get “bourgeois jobs” after college.

    And, by the way, don’t “real Workers” have kids who are students? Doesn’t it follow that these “real Workers” are affected by austerity at schools and campuses? Shit, if my kid didn’t have a scholarship our family would be really screwed right now. And if and when that runs out, we’ll face the world of student loans – so the development of campus struggle has a direct impact on my family.

    “Worker” sounds like someone who doesn’t have dependents, and therefore has trouble understanding the way students and workers are organically connected in our struggle.

  6. @The Fish: While I’ve discovered that past critics have posted from none other than UCOP offices in downtown Oakland, “Worker” seems legit — and strangely enough is located in my dad’s hometown outside of Chicago.

    @Huli: Couldn’t agree more. “Free-loading” students *equals* relieved workers. As someone who teaches at UCB, I know that a majority of the students in my department are community college transfer students and the overwhelming majority — at least those who I’ve taught — come from working class backgrounds. The number of students I’ve had who work 20-40 h/wk while taking a full course load is surprising — it’s seems it’s becoming the norm as debt slavery takes its toll.

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